5 Surefire Ways to Get Better Sleep During Pregnancy

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Sleeping During Pregnancy

Pregnancy can be a busy time for you. It seems like everything is happening at once, and you cannot seem to get caught up. Between work, shopping for fashionable maternity clothes, making plans for the baby, and your fluctuating hormones, you might feel like you can never get a break.

Doctors recommend getting at least eight hours of sleep per night, but if you are pregnant, just the thought of getting sleep in any amount might seem elusive. Daily stresses can play a record all night through your mind, and late in your term, when your body has grown and changed its shape, the positions in which you used to sleep might not be comfortable or safe any longer. Just by following some guidelines, these issues can be dealt with, and you can get the sleep you need.

#Get Into the Best Sleeping Position

The best sleeping position is not on your stomach or your back. These positions can be harmful to your baby since they both put too much pressure on your stomach.

Instead, the best way to sleep for both your baby and your back is on your side. Use a pillow to support your stomach and a small pillow between your knees. The pillow between your knees helps your legs and hips to maintain the natural positions they are in when you are standing.

Without a pillow between your knees, your legs and hips can compress together overnight, leading to pain in the morning. If you do not want two pillows, another option would be to sleep with your arms and legs wrapped around a body pillow. These are especially comfortable, and they can be used even after the baby has come and you return to your previous sleeping style.

#Alleviate Pregnancy Discomforts

Many things can keep you awake at night when you are expecting, besides stress and discomfort. Many women, when they are pregnant, develop restless leg syndrome (RLS). This disorder affects up to one-fifth of all pregnant women during the last trimester of their term. Many sufferers describe it as a “creepy, crawly” feeling in their legs that makes them want to move their legs.

Doctors are unsure of the exact cause of pregnancy onset RLS, but they note that it wears off within a month of giving birth for most women. This most often occurs when the woman is in bed or just relaxing. Some believe that iron deficiency is the cause since additional iron supplements seem to help relieve many.

Other women find that putting hot and or cold packs on their legs at night helps. See which of these drug-free solutions helps you since it is not advised that pregnant women take unnecessary drugs during their term, even for RLS.

#Relieve Heartburn

It plagues women during the day, and when it does, it can be bad enough, but at night, it seems unbearable. It feels like a fiery sword in your chest, stabbing you right behind your breastbone. Many women have called their doctors in a panic, believing that they were amidst a heart attack. This is always the safest course of action if you are uncertain, but the good news for most of these ladies is that they just had severe heartburn or acid reflux.

Acid reflux can be especially problematic at night when you lie down. That is when acid in the stomach can rise into the esophagus and burn it. Besides taking calcium antacids, like TUMS, you can do other more natural things to prevent it.

  • Try to elevate the head of your bed by about four or five inches. You can either sleep on top of a second pillow or purchase a bed wedge made specifically for this purpose.
  • Avoid heavy meals close to bedtime and try not to have anything for two to three hours before bed.
  • Always wear breathable cotton maternity nighties to stay comfortable and allow enough room for movement during sleep.
  • Saliva is a natural antacid that works better than over-the-counter medications. Try to drink some cool water if you feel the acid rise or chew on some gum.
  • If you still have heartburn that wakes you in the middle of the night, talk to your doctor to see if she recommends any other treatments.

#Get Rid of Nausea

Sleep is vital any time of your life, but especially when you are pregnant. Your changing body, though, can make getting the sleep you need difficult. Many women find that morning sickness actually can occur at any time of the day or night. They have been awakened in the middle of the night with a desperate need to vomit. If you are so plagued, there are some things you might be able to try to soothe your stomach and get relief.

Many women find some saltines or soda crackers next to the bed to nibble when nausea hits. Some moms-to-be have even found that bananas, ice water, or club soda can help. This is just a matter of whatever works for you. Another drug-free method of nausea relief could be to find an acupressure band such as those sold for seasickness. Apply pressure on the inside of the wrist, just below the hand. Many find that pressing here alleviates nausea.

#Avoid Caffeine

You probably have heard that how well you sleep at night is based upon what you do during the day. What you eat, drink, and do while awake influences what your body will do when asleep. You probably already know to avoid caffeine during the day. This is due to its effects on your baby, but it can also have adverse reactions to your sleep. There is a two-fold reason for this.

Caffeine is a stimulant, so it will keep you awake, but it also acts as a diuretic. This means that you will be getting up more often to go to the bathroom in the middle of the night. You should avoid all caffeine if possible and limit the amount you drink right before bed.

You should also limit what you eat before bed. It would be a good idea to avoid large, heavy meals two to three hours before you go to sleep since you could suffer a bad-bought acid reflux or nausea if you lie down too soon after eating a large dinner.

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