MOT Test

The Evolution Of MOT Test And Vehicle Emissions Testing

Motorists in the UK have been undergoing MOT tests for over 60 years. Introduced by the Ministry of Transport and now regulated by the Department for Transport (DfT), this essential safety check became law under the Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations 1973, with effect from 1 January 1974 as a statutory requirement. The test is now carried out on most roadworthy vehicles during their first three years and every year after that to ensure they meet specific minimum standards before being used on public roads. As such, it must be completed by registered garages that will then submit an assessment report to DVSA (Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency). Failure means a costly trip back to your garage!

Vehicle emissions testing was introduced in 1990 to ensure all road users contribute to improving urban air quality. And although this is not a legal requirement, the Government plans to become one. This means that unless you live in Northern Ireland or certain overseas territories (e.g., The Channel Islands), all cars over three years old will need an emissions test from 2020 onwards.

So what changes can we expect?

At present, almost two-thirds of motorists fail their MOT Harlow. Will the same be true of vehicle emissions tests? In addition, these new regulations will place demands on garages and affect motorists who have yet to find a local garage that they trust with their car’s servicing needs. As such, we look at how these changes could affect us in the future and what this might mean for you.

Let’s start with a look at MOT testing from 1963 …

We take a whistle-stop tour of MOT history to discover key changes in emissions standards – and how they have occurred over time…

The first-ever MOT test was implemented on 1 January of that year. All roadworthy vehicles registered after 1 September 1959 needed to undergo an annual safety check before being used on public roads. This meant that new cars were required to get their first MOT by 14 August 1963, which is why some motorists may still get theirs then. In addition, only 30 per cent of British roads passed the initial official tests! So it’s no surprise that failure rates were high.

However, it didn’t take long for the MOT test to go from strength to strength. By 1969, approximately one million cars were being tested each year. And, of course, more garages opened up across the country, lowering failure rates.

Then in 1990, vehicle emissions tests were introduced for petrol cars over three years old and diesel cars over two years old. They required all vehicle exhausts to pass a simple colour match on an official taper (similar to that used for tyre-testing). The aim was to improve air quality and reduce noise levels on Britain’s roads… But both petrol and diesel models had to undergo this type of check at their own cost – except those that had been declared ‘unfit’.

In 1998, a new MOT test was introduced for all petrol cars over four years old and diesel cars over three years old. This included patrols from 1 September 2001 and gallons of diesel from 1 May 1999. This further widened the scope of testing, with many garages now offering their MOT services on a more flexible basis. Plus, they could choose which type(s) of car they wanted to work on.

“Before this time, MOT service providers usually only worked on a single type of vehicle,” explains Simon Williams, commercial director of My Garage Solutions Ltd. The latter have been operating an online directory for garages since 2000. “So it gave them a much greater choice in what they were able to offer. And it was only when the European Union developed the Star Diagnosis System (in 2000) that we saw all MOTs adopt a demanding and more consistent service standard for motorists,” he continues.

2006 marked another significant milestone – with cars now requiring an annual emissions check from 40 different systems. This included complex diagnostic computers, which by 2012 were linked directly to manufacturers’ software networks, enabling vehicles to communicate on the move with specific garages (a practice known as ‘telematics’). Adding further layers of testing to checks carried out on both petrol and diesel models helped reduce carbon dioxide emissions significantly in the long term while tackling safety issues such as faulty brakes and lights…

In 2012, a new MOT emissions test was introduced, which covered a car’s tailpipe emissions from 20 different systems. As such, all diesel models from September this year have been required to pass the environmental ‘Real Driving Emissions (RDE) test under laboratory conditions. In addition, government officials now need to approve petrols before being tested.

From May 2018 onwards, MOT testing will be extended further still – with many garages being made responsible for checking diesel cars over four years old and petrol over three years old. “Over time, this means that motorists will benefit from a more consistent level of service across the country,” explains Simon Williams. However, there is a possible fly in the ointment. “It’s still unclear how this will affect the way motorists pay for their MOT,” he adds, citing concerns about rising costs and an even greater pressure on these independent garages to make a profit (due to the risk of re-selling cars that do not comply with the new legislation).

“What we’re hoping would happen is that garages can work together to share resources and expertise,” he continues, pointing out that Nissan and Renault both see telematics as a big part in improving driver assistance.”

Point seven: From May 2018 onwards, MOT testing will be extended further still – with many garages being made responsible for checking diesel cars over four years old and petrol over three years old.

“Over time, this means that motorists will benefit from a more consistent level of service across the country,” explains Simon Williams. However, there is a possible fly in the ointment. “It’s still unclear how this will affect the way motorists pay for their MOT,” he adds, citing concerns about rising costs and an even greater pressure on these independent garages to make a profit (due to the risk of re-selling cars that do not comply with the new legislation).”

What we’re hoping will happen is that garages can work together to share resources and expertise,” he continues, pointing out that Nissan and Renault both see telematics as a big part in improving driver assistance.”

Another notable change will be the stricter testing on emissions, with cars being checked more stringently for CO2 emissions across a wider range of systems. “This is great news for motorists as it means that all vehicles will have to run more efficiently,” says Simon Williams.

The main change in point eight is that cars will be checked more stringently for CO2 emissions across a wider range of systems. “This is great news for motorists as it means that all vehicles will have to run more efficiently,” says Simon Williams.

The final change has been the introduction of a new Roadworthiness Test (RT), which covers:
  • Corrosion in bodywork and chassis.
  • Brakes and tyres Harlow.
  • Steering and suspension.
  • Windscreen and wipers.
  • Lights and reflectors.
  • Registration plates and speedometer/odometer calibration.
  • Glazing, safety belts, fuel cap and exhaust.

However, this test has come under criticism due to its focus on damage rather than safety issues such as faulty brakes or lights…

About skyautoblogger

Sky Smith is dedicated to bringing you the best and largest selection of writing prompts and writing inspiration on the internet. Whether you are looking for free guest posting websites or need a guest blogging agency to design and implement a full content marketing strategy, Blogg Booster is here to help.

Check Also

Best Bike Under 1 Lakh for You to Consider

One of the key mediums of commutation for millions of people is the bike. Over …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *